Update – Skilling Australian Fund Levy Passed by Senate

The Migration Amendment (Skilling Australians Fund) Bill 2017 (Bill) has now been passed by the Senate. An outline of the key requirements for skilled visa sponsors is explained below.

Contributions to the Fund

The Bill replaces the Training Benchmark A or B requirement (whereby sponsors have to pay 1% or 2% of payroll expenditure towards training) with mandatory contributions to the Skilling Australians Fund. Once the new requirements commence, businesses looking to sponsor employees for a Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) (Subclass 482) visa will have to make a contribution of $1,200 (businesses with a turnover of less than $10 million) or $1,800 (all other business) in respect of each year they sponsor a worker on a TSS visa.

Businesses sponsoring employees for an Australian permanent residence visa will need to make a $3,000 (business with a turnover under $10 million) or $5,000 (business with a turnover over $10 million) one-off contribution.

Changes to Labour Market Testing Requirements

Senator Cameron’s amendments to the Bill regarding labour market testing (LMT) were agreed to in the Senate, namely:

  • LMT be conducted within 4 months before the nomination is received;
  • Advertising must be for at least 4 weeks and must be targeted so that it can reach a significant proportion of suitably qualified and experienced Australians; and
  • The skills and experience appropriate to the position to be included in the advertisement.

 The Bill will commence subject to Royal Assent and regulatory publication. Businesses considering nominating a skilled worker from overseas should ensure they stay informed about the progress of this Bill and comply with new requirements as they come into force.

For advice regarding skilled visas, please do not hesitate to contact us at info@hartmanlawyers.com.au for Australian immigration assistance.

Disclaimer:

The information on this website is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on relevant matters. It is not intended to be comprehensive nor does it constitute legal advice. You are advised to seek legal or other professional advice before acting or relying on any of the content contained in this website.