Category: Working Holiday visas

Changes to Health Requirements for Certain Visas

On 18 November 2017 new visa condition 8602 was introduced as well as changes to the health insurance requirements for subclass 457 visas, as explained below.

New Condition 8602

New Condition 8602 has been introduced which requires the visa holder not to have any outstanding public health debts while in Australia. Public health debts are those reported the Department of Immigration and Border Protection by any Commonwealth, State or Territory health authority but do not include health costs which are covered by health insurance or Medicare, or are for treatment for certain community health risks (eg tuberculosis).

Breach of condition 8602 may result in visa cancellation. Accordingly, visa holders who accrue a public health debt should arrange to repay any this debt with the relevant provider as soon as possible to avoid their visa being cancelled.

Visa Condition 8602 will be discretionary for some visas and mandatory for several visas including (but not limited to):

  • Subclass 188 (Business Innovation and Investment)
  • Subclass 400 (Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist))
  • Subclass 407 (Training)
  • Subclass 408 (Temporary Activity) (certain streams only)
  • Subclass 417 (Working Holiday)
  • Subclass 457 (Temporary Work (Skilled))
  • Subclass 461 (New Zealand Citizen Family)
  • Subclass 462 (Work and Holiday)
  • Subclass 476 (Skilled – Recognised Graduate)
  • Subclass 485 (Temporary Graduate)
  • Subclass 489 (Skilled – Regional)
  • Subclass 500 (Student)
  • Subclass 600 (Visitor)
  • Subclass 601 (Electronic Travel Authority)
  • Subclass 651 (eVisitor)
  • Subclass 676 (Tourist)

Health Insurance Requirements for Subclass 457 visas

Subclass 457 visa applicants no longer need to provide evidence, or a letter from their insurer confirming their health insurance arrangements when applying for a visa – they simply need to indicate they have made adequate arrangements on the online form.

However Condition 8501, “maintain health insurance” itself has not been changed – that is, 457 visa holders must still maintain adequate health insurance while in Australia.

Need Assistance?

Contact our firm at info@hartmanlawyers.com.au for more information regarding the most appropriate Australian visa strategy for your circumstances.

Disclaimer:

The information on this website is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on relevant matters. It is not intended to be comprehensive nor does it constitute legal advice. You are advised to seek legal or other professional advice before acting or relying on any of the content contained in this website.

Australian Working Holiday visa

Greater Flexibility for the Australian Working Holiday Visa Program

The Australian Working Holiday visa program enables young people from eligible countries to travel to Australia for up to one year.

In a bid to expand the Working Holiday visa program and encourage more working holiday makers to travel to Australia, the Federal Government has recently introduced changes which have resulted in more flexibility for visa holders and Australian employers.

Increase of the Working Holiday Visa Maximum Age Limit

The maximum age limit for applicants for the Working Holiday visa has been increased from 30 years to 35 years. Not only does this provide greater flexibility for visa applicants, but may also result in Australian businesses benefiting from slightly older travellers who may have a higher level of experience in the workforce.

Ability to Work for One Employer Beyond Six Months

Previously, holders of Working Holiday visas required special permission from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection to work for an employer for more than six months.  Working Holiday visa holders can now work with the same employer for up to 12 months, in circumstances where the work is undertaken in different locations and work in any one location does not exceed six months.

For example, a visa holder can work with one employer for up to 12 months in:

  • hotels, resorts or restaurants within the same chain, provided they are in different premises;
  • independently owned franchises, in different workplaces;
  • State and Territory schools and health care facilities, provided these facilities are at different addresses; and
  • separate branches or facilities of the same organisation or business owner.

 

This allows employers to transfer the skills gained by their employee to another location or branch within the business.

Lowered Tax Rates for Working Holiday Visa Holders

From 1 July 2017, working holiday makers will be taxed at 15% on earnings up to $37,000. Previously, the tax rate was 19% for earnings up to $37,000.

Benefits to Australian Businesses

As well as benefiting the Australian tourist industry, the Working Holiday visa program has assisted Australian businesses requiring workers on a casual or short-term basis in specific roles. The expanded and more flexible Working Holiday visa program will provide Australian businesses with the opportunity to hire more senior employees with an increase in the age limit and in certain situations, retain working holiday makers for a 12 month period.

For advice regarding Working Holiday visas, please do not hesitate to contact us at info@hartmanlawyers.com.au for Australian immigration assistance.

Disclaimer:

The information on this website is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on relevant matters. It is not intended to be comprehensive nor does it constitute legal advice. You are advised to seek legal or other professional advice before acting or relying on any of the content contained in this website.

Long-Term Australian Business Visa for Singaporean Nationals

New Long-Term Australian Business Visa for Singaporean Nationals

The Australian Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, announced a new long-term Australian Business visa for Singaporean nationals during his recent official visit to Singapore earlier this month.

Singaporeans will have exclusive access to a new long-term, multiple-entry visa option by 1 January 2018. This will render it easier for Singaporean nationals to travel to Australia for business and tourism.

The long-term visa will be a separate stream within the Visitor (Subclass 600) visa and will allow eligible Singaporean nationals to travel to Australia for up to three months at a time over a six-year period, with a single application.

In addition to the new long-term business visa, Prime Minister Turnbull announced a new reciprocal arrangement with the Singaporean Government to extend the Work and Holiday visa program. This will enable a maximum of 500 young Australian and Singaporeans to undertake short term work or study within the reciprocal country. The Federal Government announced that the Australia-Singapore Work and Holiday visa arrangement will commence on 1 August 2017.

The new visa arrangements are intended to further boost business and tourism links between Australia and Singapore.

Disclaimer:

The information on this website is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on relevant matters. It is not intended to be comprehensive nor does it constitute legal advice. You are advised to seek legal or other professional advice before acting or relying on any of the content contained in this website.

Work and Holiday Visa Extended to Israel

A Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Australian Federal Government and the Israeli Government on 22 October 2014, establishing a reciprocal Work and Holiday visa arrangement.

The implications of this are that Israeli citizens between the ages of 18 and 30 (after completing military service) will be eligible to apply for a Work and Holiday (subclass 462) visa which will enable them to work legally in Australia for up to one year.  The Work and Holiday visa enables visa holders to undertake short term work or study as well as allowing an extended holiday in Australia.

The Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) has announced that it will allow up to 500 young adults from Israel and up to 500 young adults from Australia to be granted this visa.  After these places have been filled, it seems that the visa will be capped annually.

The DIBP has announced that the Australian and Israeli Governments will work closely to implement the necessary legal and administrative processes to bring this visa into effect.  The Work and Holiday arrangement will not commence until a start date has been agreed by both countries.

Negotiations are also under way to establish reciprocal Work and Holiday visa arrangements with Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Poland and the Slovak Republic.

Disclaimer:

The information on this website is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on relevant matters. It is not intended to be comprehensive nor does it constitute legal advice. You are advised to seek legal or other professional advice before acting or relying on any of the content contained in this website.